Process Pressure Measurement

Typical application: Pressure measurement

Above and below deck:

  • Cargo tank pressure
  • Cargo line pressure
  • Ballast water and Cargo pump pressure
  • Hydraulic pressure
  • Fire pump pressure

Pipe Pressure on the Manifold and Tank Pressure

Manifold – interface for loading and unloading

Monitoring the pipeline pressures at the manifold ensures the safety of on-board and dock equipment, and provides the basis for pump control. During loading and unloading processes, excess pressure or vacuum can arise in the product pipelines if pump capacity is too high or if valves remain closed. This can damage the manifold or the cargo tanks. Local pressure indication provides additional security for all operations.


Inert gas pressure measurement

The VEGABAR 52 pressure transmitter is particularly suitable for monitoring the gas pressure in product tanks. Its ceramic-capacitive CERTEC® measuring cell enables precise monitoring of the internal tank pressure to within a few millibars and also withstands pressure shocks caused by rough seas.


Anti-Heeling System

Counteracting the heel

Ship heeling caused by high winds, uneven cargo loading or the centrifugal forces of sharp turns, is counteracted by anti-heeling systems. Especially in the case of container ships and ferries, they prevent critical ship attitudes caused by the cargo. On cruise ships, the anti-heeling systems are applied primarily for the comfort of the passengers, while on research vessels they assure a steady platform to the sea swell. To counter the various causes of heeling, ballast tanks are connected to each other by pipe systems. Butterfly valves allow fast opening or closing of the connecting lines. Depending on the attitude of the ship, the tanks are either blown out or flooded using compressed air blowers or pumps.


Draught Measurement

Draught, trim and list

The most important measurements on board are those for determining draught, trim and list. The safety of the ship depends heavily on them. Using the values transmitted from the different measuring points, the load master, as part of the cargo control system (CCS), can determine the exact values of ship attitude and draught. One forepeak and one afterpeak measuring point are usually implemented. On larger ships, two additional measuring points are often applied midships, one portside, one starboard.


Heavy Oil Tanks & Engine Room

Settling and service tank

To ensure fuel feed to the main engine, the separated heavy fuel oil (HFO) is first pumped into the settling tank (buffer tank). The downstream service tank (day tank) is filled through continuous overflow from the settling tank and is connected directly with the main engine. Heating coils in both tanks ensure an even temperature between +75 °C and +90 °C, which keeps the oil viscosity easy to pump. A reliable level measurement in these tanks guarantees continuous availability of the ships engines.


Bilge & Leak Monitoring

Every motorized ship has a bilge well, the space between the floor of the engine room and the bottom of the ship. A water/ oil mixture collects in this space at the lowest point of the ship. The mixture is then separated by an on-board skimmer and demulsifying unit. The bilge de-oiling equipment is controlled by level switches.

The oil sumps of the main engine and the accessory systems must also be monitored continuously for safety and environmental reasons. Liquids collecting in these sumps could indicate damage to system components.


Liquid Gas Tank

Liquid petroleum gas (LPG) and liquid natural gas (LNG) applications

To ensure fuel feed to the main engine, the separated heavy fuel oil (HFO) is first pumped into the settling tank (buffer tank). The downstream service tank (day tank) is filled through continuous overflow from the settling tank and is connected directly with the main engine. Heating coils in both tanks ensure an even temperature between +75 °C and +90 °C, which keeps the oil viscosity easy to pump. A reliable level measurement in these tanks guarantees continuous availability of the ships engines.


Service & Ballast Water Tank

Drinking water and grey/black water

Drinking water is an essential commodity on a ship and it is stored in separate, dedicated tanks. Depending on the type and size of the ship, different amounts of fresh water are required for drinking, for personal hygiene as well as for cleaning. Direct electrical measuring principles are mandatory for level measurement. Waste water, so-called grey/black water, is treated on large ships using on-board treatment plants or stored in special grey/black water tanks to await final disposal.

Ballast water in the wing and double bottom tanks

The ballast water measurements in the wing and double bottom tanks go directly into the calculations for ship trim, draught and list. Since the measuring points are virtually inaccessible during operation on board, reliability and stability are an absolute must. Pressure shocks, abrasive sand particles and brackish water place additional heavy demands on the instrumentation.


Bilges & Void Spaces

Service tanks on board of naval and research vessels

Service tanks on board of naval and research vessels To extend the duration of stay at sea, every cubic centimeter of space on naval and research vessels is exploited. Existing cavities or inaccessible places on the ship are used as additional tanks for drinking water, diesel or aviation fuel. The tank shape and dimensions are completely different from familiar standard tanks and, depending on the type and size of the ship, they can extend over several decks. Tank capacity can be anywhere from one to one hundred tons. Reliable level measurement is indispensable for the continuous readiness of these ships.